save money quit smoking

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Save money quit smoking

quit smoking

Quit smoking and save money

Talking Points

  • Smoking is expensive
  • Quit smoking and save money
  • The money saved when you quit smoking can be a life changer

When it comes to smoking, it’s a no brainer: Smoking is not good for you.  It’s not good for your physical health, but I’m not going to go into the health risks; we already know what they are.  It’s, also, not good for your financial health.  I want to talk about the money you could save if you quit smoking.  Or, more to the point, what that money could do for you.

First my story: I smoked for a long time (over 40 years).  Many times I tried to quit. I tried the gum.  It upset my stomach horribly.  I tried the lozenges.  Those worked well until I stopped taking them.  Without them, the urge to smoke became overpowering.  I even tried hypnosis.  For me, that was a joke; my will power didn’t increase, and the desire to smoke didn’t decrease at all.  Anyway, you don’t have to tell me that it’s hard to stop smoking. I know from experience that it’s terribly hard.  Like anything else worth doing, it requires discipline and hard work.  And, that takes motivation.  Nothing helped until I found the right motivation.

The right motivation.  If you know me at all, you know that my “ah ha” moment would involve saving money.  One day, I really realized—I knew, I accepted, not just acknowledged—that smoking equals burning money. I was faced with a choice: continue to smoke and be out the cash (and I knew the price of cigarettes would do nothing but increase) or quit and increase the potential of my disposable income.  I chose to quit smoking.

Ok… To be honest, for a few months I had to use some of that cigarette money on a program to help me quit.  (I went back to the nicotine gum, but the determination to start saving that money—to be done with both the cigarettes and the stop smoking aids—got me through.


After about six weeks into the quitting program, I could see that my savings were increasing—slowly.  After another six weeks of progress, I was pretty impressed with how much money I was putting away.  It took a bit longer to totally get off the gum, but I was hooked on the savings.  It felt so good to have that money left over at the end of the month.

Done correctly, the amount of money I’m talking about could be life changing.  What would you do with an extra $2,000.00 a year?   Now hold that thought!

The cost of smoking in central Illinois is about $6.00 a pack.  A person who smokes one pack a day is spending $42.00 a week or almost $2,200.00 a year on cigarettes.  Over $2,000 a year!  You could save that much if you quit smoking for a year.  But, knowing the amount of savings you’d be giving up (and the effort it took to quit in the first place), why would anyone want to start again?

Are you trying to become free from debt?  Rework your budget with an extra $40.00 a week.  How much faster will this amount of money get you there?  Maybe, you are trying to save money for your emergency account or to add to an existing one.  Would this amount of money make a significant difference?  Are you trying to save for a big-ticket appliance?  A nice vacation? How much faster would you be able to meet your goal?  I am willing to bet the answer for any of these questions is very favorable.  The point is that (in the beginning) $40.00 a week is big. Over the course of several years, it’s huge.  To stop smoking is a way to start saving money now, and you’ll improve the quality of your life in more ways than one.

For smokers: The urge to smoke lasts (on the average) only 90 seconds.

Tips:   The urge to smoke will go away.  During an urge do something/anything and concentrate on that

activity.  Avoid dwelling on the urge.

Cinnamon disk candies help to lessen the intensity of a craving.

You can do it: Don’t let anything talk you out of it: Stop smoking: Save money.

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Douglas Antrim

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